Tag | MVC Posts

In a previous post, I covered a lot of the early happenings within the ASP.NET MVC Framework. Since Scott Guthrie started blogging about ASP.NET MVC, there have been follow-on articles. Here are the latest information about ASP.NET MVC: ASP.NET MVC Framework Part 2 (URL Routing) in which Scott Guthrie drills down deep into the built-in capabilities of the URL routing within ASP.NET MVC. For those chomping at the bit to get this code, this is another great post in the series. An Architectural View ...
Early Cream from Gwynn Kruger with an MVC/Silverlight.NET article. From SilverlightCream.com: Model-View-Controller Can be Done in Silverlight 1.1/2.0 Gwynn Kruger of SilverSpud is staying on the edge of things, showing us how to use MVC with Silverlight .NET Stay in the 'Light! Silverlight Tagged Web Articles | Silverlight Articles | Silverlight Tutorials | Silverlight Tooltips | SilverlightCream ...
Yesterday I referred to Scott Guthrie's post about the roadmap for coming .NET web related products, highlighting Silverlight 2.0 and ASP.NET MVC framework especially. Now, Mohamed Tayseer (my current team mate and complement in development!) sent me link to a detailed post by Roger Jennings, with many discussions and references related to these products. A must read for anyone who read the previous post. Read the post ...
Yeah, finally the long awaited preview of ASP.NET MVC Framework will be available, Yeah, I'm tired like you all of seeing so many sample codes without a way to touch them or try other things out. Also Silverlight 1.1 will keep on evolving and now has the versionning it deserves, Silverlight 2.0, which is not just a name of course, but comes with broader support of WPF and rich controls and many other features. These are only few of many super interesting announcements that Scott Guthrie [MSFT] posted ...
(This will be a live blogging event: I'll be updating this post throughout the discussion, so refresh often) The Intro Justice is lavishing the man-love on Jeffery Palermo. Things you might be offended by in this session: - Woman beating up men. - A 5 condition if statement - Rampaging masculenity- The Mad Mexican - Fantastic shirts (There were a few others) "Grab your testes, and lets go on a ride to Sexy Town" "Django, Rails, and MonoRails is all hippy speak." Nice So What's The Big Deal? OMG...Justice ...
Not since the Hart Foundation tried to take out Randy Savage after his IC Championship win over the Honky Tonk Man, where Elizabeth found Hulk Hogan in the back to come and save him from the beat down, have we seen such a formation of megapowers...until TODAY! Jeff Palermo spoke on MVC this morning, and lavished his geekly-man-love for the other MVC presenter at the Dev Teach conference: Justice Gray. After the discussion, Justice and Jeff verbally assaulted* some who questioned the validity of the ...
I was hoping for the ASP.NET Rich Client talk, but alas it was canceled...so I find myself in Jeff Palermo's session on MVC. Jeff apparantly looks good in a suit (at least that's what Julie says...). Hmm..."Things you'll lose with MVC: Viewstate, Postbacks". That's attractive... Jeff just gave Justice a plug...these guys are true blood BFF. So with the new MVC framework, your controls can still be bound on the form for rendering...you don't need to use the viewstate or postback events for it though. ...
Day 1 of our little Dev Teach adventure seems like it was enough to fill an entire week already! Others have already started blogging about it, so make sure to keep an eye on those who are here and commenting on the general happenings around Dev Teach. But I digress, back to Day 1. UG Summit Monday was the User Group summit, which Microsoft graciously hosted for us at their new downtown Vancouver offices. This also coincided with the Canadian MVP summit at the same location. Our user group discussions ...
Last month, Scott Guthrie announced the ASP.NET MVC framework which allows for built-in support for the Model View Controller based architecture. Since that time there has been a flurry of activity from Microsoft to demo the technology to the world and make demos readily available. In case you missed it, here are some of the features: Clean separation of concerns. All core contracts of the MVC framework are testable and mockable Highly pluggable to use NHibernate, Spring.NET, Windsor, and other great ...
There are a number of tools out there that will auto-gen your DAL from a database schema, most notably nHibernate. But another tool, SubSonic, should be on your queue of tools to research and investigate...especially if you're getting hot under the collar for the upcoming MVC framework from Microsoft. SubSonic is an open source product that will automagically generate your DAL and supporting entity objects based on a database schema. I've been lucky to have Kent Sharkey here in the office the last ...
Everyone is talking about the new MVC framework that will be released in the coming weeks as a CTP, and so far everyone is very pumped about the way it will revolutionize web application development...how it will allow us to utilize testing tools, TDD, etc. It's always mentioned with reverence and joy. Well, hello: my name is Killjoy. I've read Scott G.'s recent blog entry that gives a great detailed description of how the MVC framework will operate and he walks through a sample app that explains ...
You may have heard about it, now take a peek at it. Scott Hanselman has posted some MVC bits from DevConnections. You can read about it here. There's not a lot yet, but word is that a CTP is around the corner.
Justice announced on his site that he'll be speaking at Dev Teach this month on the new MVC framework Microsoft is releasing: "Introduction to the Microsoft MVC Architecture...what side are YOU on?? Presented by Justice Gray Everybody who is anybody is talking about the new MVC. And when you've heard it mentioned, you've *also* heard the standard "We can all play nice together", "there's still room for choice", "this is just an alternative" and all those other phrases that likely also involve group ...
I was wondering around in the DevConnections exhibitor area and Phil Haack and his camera guy came by and interviewed me. He asked me a few questions about the conference. This is my second time at DevConnections and it keeps getting better every time I come. For instance, Phil asked what my favorite session was so far and without skipping a beat I said "MVC." In my last post I mentioned that I have been waiting to see a presentation on MVC and when I heard they were having one here, I made sure ...
This was my first chance to see the MVC (model view controller) Framework as when I was at Tulsa TechFest, I was presenting at the same time and didn't get to see Palermo's version of it. I was blown away by Scott Hanselman's great presentation skills. He is definitely a great speaker. Phil Haack was also in the audience (the new PM for the MVC Framework). I am really excited about seeing this come out. Like Monorail, you can also plug in Brail or NVelocity as well as the default. Being able to have ...
I met a lot of amazing people at the ALT.NET conference, but the one that impressed me the most was Scott Guthrie. Besides being one of the nicest and most unassuming alpha-geeks I've ever met, he had an uncanny understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of not only Microsoft technologies, but a vast array of other technologies, languages, and open source frameworks. In some ways, the ALT.NET Conference was the ultimate testament to the effectiveness of his soft-spoken style. Despite presenting ...
Short on the heels of Phil moving to Microsoft to work on the new ASP.NET MVC Framework is the announcement that Rob Conery, the creator of SubSonic, is also moving to Microsoft. Rob will be building out SubSonic to sit on top of ASP.NET and the new MFV Framework. So, as Rob puts it, "SubSonic will be the convention-driven toolset for Microsoft's new MVC framework." Fortunately for all of us, SubSonic hasn't been bought and will remain open source under the MPL 1.1 license it currently has. This ...
You've probably heard all of the buzz around Microsoft's new ASP.NET MVC Framework. This is a framework methodology that divides an application's implementation into three component roles: models, views, and controllers. You've probably also heard about a slightly different approach called Model View Presenter (MVP). If you ever wanted to know the difference between the MVC and MVP patterns and why you should use one over the other, Todd Snyder from Infragistics has an excellent explanation. He sums ...

One of our newly anointed Guidisans Todd Snyder has posted an excellent blog post on the differences between the MVC and MVP patterns, something that has long confused me.  A very well written article that worth the read.

There have been plenty of posts about the new asp.net MVC framework that was posted from the alt.net conference. There's very little that I can add to those posts other than I am really excited. Right after that Scott Hanselman (the link to the video is in this link) did a demo of possible ways the MVC could be used to along with the Dynamic Language Runtime. Not only is the MVC code in prototype, but Scott really only had a couple days to show how you could use the DLR with it, so obviously what ...
Even though Phil just recently started working at Koders.com and even more recently became a Microsoft MVP, he's leaving Koders to move (eventually) a bit farther north and is joining Microsoft to work with Scott Guthrie on the new MVC framework for ASP.NET. He starts at Microsoft on October 15. Best luck, Phil. I expect to see some really great things in the new framework. I'm just a bit envious, too. :) ...
So the MVC pattern is basically layered architecture for a Web application. The Model provides business process layer. It models the data and behavior behind the business process. As part of performing business process, the model layer might perform database access, calculating business process, or processing orders for example. One important point to remember is that Model encapsulates data and behavior independent of how they are presented. That is, the presentation could change depending on the ...
I'm getting to teach TDD and MVC to some really great people who are really enjoying it. But in doing this, I've come across an interesting question. How do you transform your organization into something that can only be called "a learning organization"? Think about it, what would your work be like if every one was coming into work saying, "I was listening to a pod cast this weekend, and it got me thinking about ....." and two minutes later someone else interrupts saying, "oh, that's cool, it totally ...

http://www.castleproject.org/

I am pretty impressed from what I've seen so far with the Castle Project. They offer an MVC framework, an object-to-relational persistence framework and a few other things. I looked through the examples and it seems like it is well-documented and pretty straightforward to use.

Lately I have been having a crisis of faith about MonoRail and have been looking at ASP.Net again. All of the neat controls, and IDE support are sooooo tempting. So late last night I happened to catch Ayende online and here is what he had to say: ASP.Net Pro Because it is what everyone use. Has controls Isolate from web Con Isolate from web You work in a different model than what really is - leaky abstraction view state Very complex model for doing really simple stuff. Encourage mixing of UI / BAL ...
The goal of the MVC design pattern is to separate the application object (model) from the way it is represented to the user (view) from the way in which the user controls it (controller). The Model object knows about all the data that need to be displayed. It also knows about all the operations that can be applied to transform that object. However, it knows nothing whatever about the GUI, the manner in which the data are to be displayed, nor the GUI actions that are used to manipulate the data. The ...
[This post is long, and is mostly a brain dump] I recently started a bender of coding where I am trying to move all of my transaction management code out of my Controllers (MVC controllers) and in to a more appropriate place. But since I am striving for a POCO model where in the hell can I put this code and still seperate all of my concerns? I start digging into "POJOs in Action" and see that Chris uses a class called a Facade to manage this transaction junk. It sits between the view logic and the ...
For the past year or so, Martin Fowler has included the pattern Model-View-Presenter, or MVP, in his upcoming addendum to Patterns of Enterprise Application Development. Due to apparent confusions between MVC and MVP, Fowler has now split this pattern into what he's calling “Passive View” (http://martinfowler.com/ea... and “Supervising Controller/Presenter” (http://martinfowler.com/ea... (Now what am I to do! ;) Passive View ...
These 3 technologies are the primary elements of the Service Oriented approach of Microsoft. Let’s take some time to get to know these and compare them. This is the first in a serie of articles about SOA. Biztalk Server A message integration platform. It's primary goal is to accept messages in various formats on a (receive) location and send them on another (send) location. During this an encryption/decryption can take place, messages can be converted to another format (from one XSD schema ...
Well, since Sir Georgio decided to give me some crap about losing focus, I figured I would post about what I've been doing. The MVC work is all finished, cleaned up, refactored, and ready to drop a bunch of new types of enemies into the game. Before I did that though, I decided to clean up the graphics a bit. One of the first tasks was to implement a "playing field" that play would take place on. Before, play was just the whole screen which wasn't very conducive for HUD-like UI (like Score, Lives, ...
Just a quick update for the night before I head off to bed :). I finished my move over to a more Model/View/Controller-centric codebase. The move was pretty painless. The code is definitely starting to look a lot cleaner. I like seeing smaller sized classes that only have a single responsibility :). Of course, the MVC pattern does mean more code in general, but the code that is there is much more cleaner and easier to maintain if done well. So I'm not so worried about that. The gist of it is that ...
[Crosspost from Managed World] I have now ported over most of the Console functionality from Boom!. I still haven't ported over the ConsoleRenderer yet, so I'll just tackle that tomorrow hopefully. As a little background, Boom! was originally written in 1.1, so I've been pleasantly surprised with how much code I've been able to remove simply because I can use Generics now. The downside? We're not using 2.0 at work yet so it's torture everytime I need a strongly-typed dictionary or list during my ...
The source code for SmartPetShop, my sample project for Composite UI Application Block, is now available for download. If you want to run it, first I recommend to download and install the original PetShop.NET 3.2 from Microsoft , as it will setup properly the database and register COM+ services. After that you should update the connection strings in Win application's app.config with encrypted settings taken from original Web PetShop's web.config. Simply find settings like and copy them to app.config. ...
Can you really create an application UI that has no business logic in it? I think that the answer is really in the gray area. When developing an applicaiton most developers don't think too hard about how to keep the business logic out of the classes that support the UI. I am not saying that everyone is mixing everything together into one big class, but at the same time I have been on a lot of large scale application developments and most of them mix in some level of business logic in the UI. Is this ...
Yesterday I was reading CAB message boards and came across number of threads with questions about implementing MVP patter in CAB. Indeed, among provided samples only the walk-through uses MVP but its rather simplistic. Luckily some of these questions got answered. First of all I've learned of the Smart Client Baseline Architecture Toolkit project, that aims to provide collection of guidance for implementing Smart Clients (including Hands-On-Labs, How-Tos and Reference Applications). Although the ...
Next important part of Composite UI, if not the most significant, is the WorkItem. According to documentation it “a run-time container for components that are working together to fulfill a use case. These components may consist of SmartParts, controllers, services, UIElements, and other components.” So if we look at Outlook as example here, we have use cases like: browsing email, scheduling appointments or looking up contacts. As I understand, these would correspond to main WorkItems ...
In getting up to speed on Avalon development I have been reading John Gossman’s blog about Avalon development. In his post What's a controller anyway? He links to an article about MVC. This article talks about the origination of MVC in the SmallTalk days and how there are several other patterns out there that describe what is commonly referred to as “MVC” It is good to know the history of things if you are truly going to understand them. I thought that I really understood MVC. I ...
I was able to attend the CAB training session at Redmond earlier this week. It was a very informative couple of days. We were able to meet and talk with the dev team of CAB. We went through a series of Hands On Labs that will be available soon. I am still trying to get my head around the how CAB works at a detail level. I have a good understanding of things at at a higher level. If you are building a larger client application (non ASP) then you would be doing yourself a favor by looking at it. It ...
[Crosspost from Managed World] For all of you out there who are wanting to see more game development articles, I have decided to wait until I have my first prototype of the sample game up and running before I start writing the articles. I think this will be the best thing for all parties involved. That way, I don't have to keep on changing and updating the articles as I refactor my code (it is a work in progress after all). Also, you don't have to wait for me to get my patooty in gear. When you see ...
Ralf has put up a couple of posts here and here regarding app architecture that everyone should read. His ideas are very similiar to the ideas that we have been implementing ourselves (are you reading this Donnie). One point that I don't particularly agree with is the we should have been using COM+ more. I feel that COM+ is a useful benefit in a relatively small percentage of systems. When you need it you'll know, but it would never be the first thing I look at for a system design. I also believe ...